Interpreting long-term trends in Blue Mountain ecosystems from repeat photography
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Interpreting long-term trends in Blue Mountain ecosystems from repeat photography

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station in Portland, Or. (333 S.W. First Ave., P.O. Box 3890, Portland 97208) .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Landscape ecology -- Blue Mountains (Or. and Wash.) -- History -- Pictorial works,
  • Landscape changes -- Blue Mountains (Or. and Wash.) -- History -- Pictorial works,
  • Biotic communities -- Blue Mountains (Or. and Wash.) -- History -- Pictorial works,
  • Forest ecology -- Blue Mountains (Or. and Wash.) -- History -- Pictorial works,
  • Repeat photography -- Blue Mountains (Or. and Wash.),
  • Blue Mountains (Or. and Wash.) -- Pictorial works

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementJon M. Skovlin and Jack Ward Thomas
GenrePictorial works
SeriesGeneral technical report PNW -- GTR-315, General technical report PNW -- 315
ContributionsThomas, Jack Ward
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Paginationii, 102 p.
Number of Pages102
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16135234M

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  Author of Interpreting long-term trends in Blue Mountain ecosystems from repeat photography, Fluctuations in forage quality on summer range in the Blue Mountains, Hank Vaughan, , In pursuit of the McCartys, Winter diets of elk and deer in the Blue Mountains, Oregon, Timber harvest affects elk distribution in the Blue Mountains of Oregon, . Thomas, Jack Ward: Interpreting long-term trends in Blue Mountain ecosystems from repeat photography / (Portland, Or. ( S.W. First Ave., P.O. Box , Portland ): U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, []), also by Jon M. Skovlin and Or.) Pacific Northwest Research Station (Portland (page. Given the advantages of digital repeat photography in terms of logistics, consistency, continuity and objectivity, we expect growing archives of landscape images to become important data streams for phenological research. One crucial aspect for long-term measurements is the stability of the measured by: Interpreting Landscape Change in High Mountains of Northeastern Oregon from Long-Term Repeat Photography Jon M. Skovlin, Gerald S. Strickler, Jesse L. Peterson, and Arthur W. Sampson United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station General Technical Report PNW-GTR May Photo by Harley Richardson.

Cornett; Interpreting Long-Term Trends in Blue Mountain Ecosystems from Repeat Photography by Jon M. Skovlin, Jack Ward Thomas; Time and the Tuolumne Landscape: Continuity and Change in the Yosemite High Country by Thomas R. Vale, Geraldine R. Vale. Interpreting long-term trends in Blue Mountain ecosystems from repeat photography. General Technical Report PNW-GTR Portland, OR: USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station. p. The Other Oregon Cox, Thomas R. Published by Oregon State University Press Cox, Thomas R. The Other Oregon: People, Environment, and History East of the Cascades. 1 ed. Oregon Sta. This book assembles dramatic paired photographs to demonstrate both the persistence of nature and the presence of humanity. Interpreting long-term trends in Blue Author: Dawna Cerney.

GTR () Interpreting long-term trends in Blue Mountain ecosystems from repeat photography by J.M. Skovlin and J.W. Thomas. GTR () Volume I: Executive summary by R. Everett, P. Hessburg, M. Jensen, and B. Bormann. Interpreting long‑term trends in Blue Mountain ecosystems from repeat photography. Portland, OR U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, General Technical Report. In all, repeat-photosets were compiled – by the author and 18 by Earl Hindley. As might be expected, most photosets contained more than one vegetation type. Grasslands were depicted in photosets, sagebrush in 99, pinyon-juniper in , mountain brush in 72, aspen in 37, conifers in , blackbrush in 71, and woody riparian species. used repeat photography as a scien-tific tool in the United States. In , Homer Shantz repeated images he had taken on and excursions from Cape Town to Cairo in Africa (Shantz and Turner, ). This publication, the first book-length report of landscape change relying entirely on repeat photography, was.